A4EA - Demanding Power Events Catalogue - Kaleidoscopio Oct 2022.xlsx (49.73 kB)
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Data for research article "Demanding power Mozambique: protests over electricity and fuel in peri-urban Greater Maputo"

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posted on 14.12.2021, 12:16 authored by Euclides Gonçalves, João Chambisso, Énio Tembe, Sandra Gonçalves

The dataset contains data from a research on the IDS working paper “Demanding power Mozambique: protests over electricity and fuel in peri-urban Greater Maputo”. This working paper was a part of the 'Demanding Power' workstream of the Action for Empowerment and Accountability (A4EA) programme at IDS.


This news-based event catalogue lists contentious key episodes around electricity and fuel in Mozambique from 2005 to 2020. The aim is to enable analysis of selected episodes involving protests around electricity and fuel prices, to understand grievances, mobilization, norm-setting and framing and protest repertoires of the contentious politics of electricity and fuel in Mozambique.


The catalogue is based on online available sources that included headlines related to electricity and fuel protests. Sources considered were conventional and registered media outlets or cited news from national or international conventional and registered new sources.


The catalogue is constituted of 51 entries that combine electricity and fuel protests. 31 entries refer to macro-protests of 2008 and 2010 and 20 entries refer to micro-protests related to electricity and fuel for the 2005-2020 period.


The aim is to enable analysis of selected episodes involving protests around electricity and fuel prices, to understand the following dimensions of the contentious politics of electricity and fuel:


· Grievances: what were the main points of contention between the actors? How did protestors articulate their grievances in relation to fuel prices? How, specifically, did they involve states or governments in their demands or claims?


· Mobilization: how was collective action mobilized? What resources – shared location, common occupations or transport or communications networks – enabled people to act in common? To what extent were protestors driven or supported by other, pre-existing groups or organizations (trade unions, political parties, etc)?


· Norm-setting and framing: how did protests set new norms, or frame the issues in politically-powerful ways? What evidence is there that they reshaped debates about fuel prices?


· Repertoires: what kinds of strategies did protestors use, and to what effect? How did strategies (language, platforms, spaces, aesthetics) evolve over time?



Funding

Grant Identifier Number- GB-1-204427. Funder- Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office

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