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Scott_et_al_(2014)_Blind_Insight.pdf (622.85 kB)

Blind insight: metacognitive discrimination despite chance task performance

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posted on 2023-06-08, 19:05 authored by Ryan ScottRyan Scott, Zoltan DienesZoltan Dienes, Adam BarrettAdam Barrett, Daniel Bor, Anil SethAnil Seth
Blindsight and other examples of unconscious knowledge and perception demonstrate dissociations between judgment accuracy and metacognition: Studies reveal that participants’ judgment accuracy can be above chance while their confidence ratings fail to discriminate right from wrong answers. Here, we demonstrated the opposite dissociation: a reliable relationship between confidence and judgment accuracy (demonstrating metacognition) despite judgment accuracy being no better than chance. We evaluated the judgments of 450 participants who completed an AGL task. For each trial, participants decided whether a stimulus conformed to a given set of rules and rated their confidence in that judgment. We identified participants who performed at chance on the discrimination task, utilizing a subset of their responses, and then assessed the accuracy and the confidence-accuracy relationship of their remaining responses. Analyses revealed above-chance metacognition among participants who did not exhibit decision accuracy. This important new phenomenon, which we term blind insight, poses critical challenges to prevailing models of metacognition grounded in signal detection theory.

Funding

Conscious Perception in Implicit Learning and the Emergence of Conscious Knowledge; G0160; ESRC-ECONOMIC & SOCIAL RESEARCH COUNCIL; RES-062-23-1975

CEEDS: The Collective Experience of Empathic Data Systems; G0270; EUROPEAN UNION; FP7-ICT-2009-5

Towards a next-generation computational neuroscience; G0305; EPSRC-ENGINEERING & PHYSICAL SCIENCES RESEARCH COUNCIL; EP/G007543/1

EPSRC; EP/L005131/1

Sackler Centre - donation; G0951; SACKLER-DR MORTIMER AND THERESA SACKLER FOUNDATION

History

Publication status

  • Published

File Version

  • Published version

Journal

Psychological Science

ISSN

0956-7976

Publisher

Sage Publications

Issue

12

Volume

25

Page range

2199-2208

Department affiliated with

  • Informatics Publications

Full text available

  • Yes

Peer reviewed?

  • Yes

Legacy Posted Date

2014-11-13

First Open Access (FOA) Date

2014-11-13

First Compliant Deposit (FCD) Date

2014-11-13

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